fbpx
Loading...

Scattering – Practical Tips for Scattering Ashes

Scattering the ashes of a loved one is a very personal, emotional, and private event. It can help to understand the rules and regulations around doing this in both private and public spaces.

Human ashes don’t provide a health hazard to the living or to the environment. The remains are essentially powdered fragments of the deceased person’s bones. All metal and other elements are removed before being given to the family. Families usually decide to buy a Scattering Urn to transport the ashes to the locations and ideally a Scatter urn will help the family better control the scattering of the ashes. Click here for some examples.

It’s good to note that many mountaineering societies request that human ash isn’t scattered on high hills and mountainsides as the remains have been shown to have a negative impact on alpine plants. The ash covers delicate foliage and can sometimes destroy the plant.

Plant an Irish Oak Memorial Tree, in memory, as an enduring gesture to help heal the heart and the planet. Click HERE for more information A handwritten card will accompany the Planting Certificate.

It quickly becomes apparent that there are contradictions and differences between countries and societies when it comes to scattering the ash of a deceased loved one.

Here are some common rules that countries like Ireland, the UK, Canada, Australia, and the USA all share:

You can scatter ashes on the property that you own without any permission.

If space is privately owned, you’ll need to get permission from the owner.

In the UK, local authority-owned space can require permission. Many decide to go ahead and scatter or bury ashes without permission. Be aware that can create issues with some vigilant park wardens. It could potentially ruin a sacred moment if someone in a high-vis vest picks a fight with you about the ‘rules’.

Some Botanic Gardens (such as Kew Gardens in London) allow ash scattering once you seek permission.

Scattering ashes on a waterway is permissible unless it is an owned stream, river, or lake where you should ask the owner for permission.

If the ceremony takes place from a pier, you are requested to ask permission from the Harbourmaster.

Scattering ashes at sea doesn’t require permission. However, an exception is California in the US specifically prefers if the ashes are scattered at least 500 yards off the coast.

If you’d like to scatter ashes on a family grave you should know that some cemeteries don’t allow this. Some cemeteries also charge fees for interment (or burial) of urns containing ashes into a grave.

If you want to transport ashes to another world-wide location:

Most airlines and shipping companies require ashes to be contained in non-metallic containers.

You’ll also need a statement from the crematorium identifying that these are the remains of your deceased loved one.

There are exceptions to the above. For example, Qantas doesn’t require any specific containers or certificates for ashes flown out of Australia.

Be aware that remains will be screened through security as any object going on a plane.

If you would like to transport ashes into other countries it is best to contact the relevant consulate authorities.

Scattering ashes in US National Parks is allowed but it needs to take place away from other people and 90 meters away from water.

Ash scattering is facilitated by many ferry and cruise companies like P&O and Carnival Cruises. They frequently assist families with memorials and can facilitate services. Each company has different ways of approaching this but can usually provide the family with a private space on board to conduct a ceremony. Materials dispersed from the ship must all be biodegradable.
Be aware of prevailing wind when scattering or casting out the ashes. Buy a scattering Urn to help keep things controlled. Make sure that you know the direction of wind or water flow is the one that you want. This segment if compliments of the wonderful Website https://aftering.com

Blog Archive


The Funeral Director can't arrange everything - and you have enough on your plate!

Whatever your beliefs, saying goodbye your way is important.   If you need advice and a little bit of help, contact Dara O’Shea and Louise O’Brien at RHEA Dara and Louise are compassionate ...

Water scattering

A dignified way to say goodbye. At Irish Urn[2] s, we wanted to create a sustainable business where we can do our part in the environmental emergency - The Sea Scattering urn which is a fully biodegradable ...

Dolmens - Ancient Irish Tomb graves for Cremation and Burial

The Burren - One of my favorite landscapes in Irelands and about .5% of the landmass.It will be no surprise that the Burren takes its name from the Irish word 'bhoireann' meaning, 'a rocky place', which ...

Keepsake and Memorial Jewellery Q&A

Keepsake and Memorial Jewellery Questions and Answers Q - What is keepsake Jewellery? A- Keepsake Jewellery is referred to as many things Cremation Jewellery, Jewellery for ashes, Memorial Jewellery, ...

Traditional Irish blessings for a funeral

Traditional Irish blessings for a funeral ~ Poems to read at an Irish funeral Irish prayer for the departed Death is nothing at all I have only slipped away to the next room. I am I, ...

Keepsake Jewelry - what is it and how does it work

Keepsake Jewellery from Ireland for ashes. When it comes to choosing a keepsake and you want something with an Irish connection and not be limited to mass-produced impersonal pieces, Irish Urns offers ...

What is an Ash necklace called?

What is an Ash necklace called? Also commonly known as Memorial or Keepsake jewelry, Keepsake for ashes, ashes pendant, ashes necklace, memorial necklace, memorial locket, cremation necklace, ...

Memorial Jewellery in Gold and Silver

Keepsake Jewellery – Keepsake Jewelry Just a short article on why they work emotionally and how they work practically. It's really difficult to make decisions about what to do with cremation ashes. ...

How to Choose the Perfect Cremation Urn

Finding the right cremation urn for a lost loved one is rarely a simple task. It is invariably a solemn endeavour, the importance of which can be overwhelming. A choice that is usually made while in ...

Urns for Ashes – Irish Celtic Symbol Engravings

Irish culture is replete with symbols which are rich in history and deep in meaning. From symbols which date back to the times of the ancient Celts to more recent symbols which have a firm place in modern ...